Author: CMOS Bulletin SCMO

Seasonal Outlook for the winter 2018/19 (DJF) based on the official CanSIPS forecast issued on the 30th Nov. 2018

– By M. Markovic, B. Merryfield, K. Gauthier, M. Alarie, Environment and Climate Change Canada –

Seasonal Outlook (December, January, February) for 2018/19 temperature and precipitation in Canada includes a cooler winter in the Hudson Bay region, a warmer one all along the west coast and up in to Canada’s North, and near normal precipitation levels for much of the country.

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CMOS Statement on the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C

The Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS) is the national society dedicated to advancing atmospheric, oceanic, and related environmental sciences in Canada. CMOS has more than 800 members from Canada’s major research centres, universities, private corporations and government institutes. CMOS is uniquely positioned to provide expert advice to Canadians on the science of climate change.

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A Look at Ontario’s Climate of the Future with the Ontario Climate Data Portal (OCDP)

– by Huaiping Zhu1, Ziwang Deng1, Jinliang Liu2, Xin Qiu3, Xiaoyu Chen1, Xiaolan Zhou1

Climate change is undeniable, and scientists around the world agree that in the coming decades the effects of a warming planet are only going to become more and more felt. What does climate change mean for Ontario? The development of the Ontario Climate Data Portal (OCDP)

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Banner Image for Gilbert's article on the origins of PM2.5 into Quebec shows a sunset skyline with smokestacks

Using Back-Trajectories to Trace the Origins of Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)

– By Jean-Philippe Gilbert, Richard Leduc, and Nathalie Barrette, Geography Department, University of Laval

Air pollution in the province of Québec, Canada is monitored daily to allow for a rapid response to public health issues. However, there are few studies concerning the long-distance trend of pollutants, and those studies that do exist focus on a small area of study. The objective of this paper is to determine the sources of certain pollutants coming in to Québec,

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Ice: Nature and Culture

– Review by Bob Jones, CMOS Archivist –

By Klaus Dodds, Published by Reaktion Books, distributed by University of Chicago Press, Paperback, 229 pages, ISBN-13: 978-1-78023-905-7, $ 24.95 (USD)

Ice is not a science textbook about ice, nor is it a manual of Ice Forecasting (the reviewer will know as he was an Ice Forecaster with the Meteorological Service of Canada in a former life). Rather it is a wide-ranging exploration of the cultural, natural and geopolitical history of ice.

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Microscopic image of different kinds of pollen. Some are small and round, others are larger and with spikes.

Pollen, Chemistry and Clouds

– By Ellen Gute, Abbatt Research Group, University of Toronto –

Clouds are a crucial part of our Earth’s atmosphere as they redistribute water resources and contribute to the atmosphere’s radiative forcing (Pruppacher and Klett 1997; Lohmann 2006). Ice is present in many clouds and is known to play a central role in precipitation formation. Despite the important role in climate, processes associated with clouds represent some of the largest uncertainties in climate models

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