Author: CMOS Bulletin SCMO

Photograph of the UBC Glider in the water, used for the study of baleen whale habitats of Roseway Basin, NS. Glider is a long yellow tube, with wings and a tail fin. It is shown floating just beneath the surface of the water.

Ocean Gliders to Study Baleen Whale Habitat in Roseway Basin

– By T. Howatt(1) T. Ross(2), S. Waterman(1); 1: University of British Columbia, 2: Institute of Ocean Sciences –

Canadian coastal waters are interspersed with baleen whale habitats, some of which are well known and protected, while others have yet to be identified and characterized.

Continue reading

Photograph to accompany the CMOS presidents message. Photo is taken from the surface of an open body of water, with a setting sun in the background

Message from CMOS President: Looking Back While Moving Forward

– By Wayne Richardson, P.Eng., CMOS President –

In 1980, I left my job in Toronto as a Senior Environmental Scientist with the Ontario Ministry of Environment and moved to Ottawa to join the Water Pollution Control Directorate in Environment Canada (EC). Over the years, I had many opportunities to move out of government, but I always chose to pursue the tremendous science and technology opportunities that presented themselves to a young environmental entrepreneur.

Continue reading

Photograph of 243 members of CMOS taken in Nathan Phillips Square at the annual congress, June 2017.

Highlights from the 51st Annual CMOS Congress, June 2017

The CMOS Congress was held June 4th to 8th in downtown Toronto at the Hilton. With over 575 registered participants, 60+ scientific sessions, 15 industry exhibitors, and an assortment of student events and social activities, the Congress was buzzing with activity right from the start.

Continue reading

Close up photograph of the eyes of an oyster toad fish.

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Data Points: How Images Can Answer our Questions About the Environment

– A Campbell Scientific advertising feature –

“What caused this unexpected spike in my data?”
“My sensor is offline – did something knock it over?”
“If only I could see for myself what the current conditions are.”
“I wish I had visuals to support the story the data is telling me.”

Anyone monitoring their environment has thought something like this at one time or another,

Continue reading

Vancouver Fall and Winter 2016/17: How Bad Was It?

– By P. Odon, G. West, R. Stull; EOAS, University of British Columbia –

The fall and winter seasons of 2016/17 were noteworthy for the cold, wet weather they brought to regions of British Columbia (BC). Although all of BC experienced some impacts, the South Coast region saw particularly large impacts from an exceptionally wet fall that quickly transitioned into a persistently cold, snowy winter.

Continue reading

Photograph of the Curiosity rover on Mars

Watching the Dust and Clouds Lazily Float by During a Martian Summer

– By J.E. Moores, C.L. Smith and C.L. Campbell, York University –

A scientific rover named Curiosity has been trundling around on Mars for the past 5 years, taking images of the atmosphere to look at cloud and dust. Because of data constraints, our group at York University get about 12 minutes of time every week or so. Imagine trying to understand the weather by looking at only one section of the sky once a week through a toilet paper tube!

Continue reading

Photograph of the face of an adult Arctic wolf. Call for abstracts for ArcticNET Arctic Change Meeting in December 2017.

Announcement: Arctic Change 2017, Call for Abstracts now OPEN

Building on the success of its previous Annual Scientific Meetings, the ArcticNet Network of Centres of Excellence and its national and international partners invite the international Arctic research community to the International Arctic Change 2017 Conference at the Quebec City Convention Centre, Québec, Canada from December 11 – 15, 2017.

Continue reading

© 2017 Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society

Designed & powered by Creative Carbon