– By John Gilbert –

The Eureka Weather Station, situated in Canada’s far North, recently celebrated its 70th birthday. Supporting operational meteorology and atmospheric research on topics that are essential for the understanding of weather and climate, including hourly synoptic and aerological weather monitoring and the detection of atmospheric change, this remote weather station is of global significance.

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Arctic Science Events in Canada and Beyond

– Compiled by Helen Joseph, CMOS Arctic SIG and HCJ Consulting –

The Arctic is experiencing unprecedented change of its ocean and terrestrial ice, permafrost and ecosystems under the triple pressures of climate change, industrialization and modernization. The impacts of these pressures can be seen on

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– By P. Odon, G. West, R. Stull; EOAS, University of British Columbia –

The fall and winter seasons of 2016/17 were noteworthy for the cold, wet weather they brought to regions of British Columbia (BC). Although all of BC experienced some impacts, the South Coast region saw particularly large impacts from an exceptionally wet fall that quickly transitioned into a persistently cold, snowy winter.

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Image from Isachsen by aAron munson shows an old yellow pick up truck covered in snow, in a frozen garage

– An Interview with Doug Munson and aAron munson by Sarah Knight, CMOS Bulletin Editor –

In 1974 Doug Munson, just 19 years old and fresh off 8 months of surface weather and upper air courses, was posted to the remote Isachsen weather station in the Canadian Arctic for a full year. Isachsen was operated on Ellef Ringnes Island from 1948-1978, and for those living there contact with the “outside” world was minimal

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Photograph of the face of an adult Arctic wolf. Call for abstracts for ArcticNET Arctic Change Meeting in December 2017.

Building on the success of its previous Annual Scientific Meetings, the ArcticNet Network of Centres of Excellence and its national and international partners invite the international Arctic research community to the International Arctic Change 2017 Conference at the Quebec City Convention Centre, Québec, Canada from December 11 – 15, 2017.

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– By Donald Reid and Douglas Bancroft, Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility (CSSF) –

The Canadian Coast Guard’s ability to support Canadian Ocean Science with ship time and facilities has been and will continue to decline even after the anticipated new science ships enter service in the coming years. It is hoped that this could be alleviated with the upcoming delivery of the versatile Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships to the Royal Canadian Navy beginning in 2018.

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– By J. Hamilton, M. Pittman, R. Pettipas, K. Phelan, S. Nudds, C. Richards, J. Barthelotte; Ocean and Ecosystem Sciences Division, DFO, Bedford Institute of Oceanography –

Oceanographic data delivered in real time can provide useful input to constrain and verify numerical models being used for ocean forecasting. Real time data from strategic locations can also be useful to marine operators whose activities may be impacted by local oceanographic conditions.

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For previous issues go to the Archives page on the main CMOS site.

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