Microscopic image of different kinds of pollen. Some are small and round, others are larger and with spikes.

Pollen, Chemistry and Clouds

– By Ellen Gute, Abbatt Research Group, University of Toronto –

Clouds are a crucial part of our Earth’s atmosphere as they redistribute water resources and contribute to the atmosphere’s radiative forcing (Pruppacher and Klett 1997; Lohmann 2006). Ice is present in many clouds and is known to play a central role in precipitation formation. Despite the important role in climate, processes associated with clouds represent some of the largest uncertainties in climate models

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Atmospheric Phenomena: From Green Flashes to Red Sprites

– By Jim Young, RWDI and Jim Young Atmospheric Services Inc. –

Summer is here with its long warm days and clear nights, for a lot of the time. And what could be better than an atmospheric phenomenon or two to point out to your friends. You may become the hit of an evening beach party.

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The MOPITT Terra spacecraft launch showing the Atlas IIAS lift-off on 18th December 1999 (Photo credit: Jim Drummond)

MOPITT, Atmospheric Pollution, and Me: A Personal Story

– By Jim Drummond, Principal Investigator for the Measurements Of Pollution in The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument on the Terra satellite –

It’s 1987 and I have just bought my first personal computer – an IBM PC clone running at a stunning 8MHz! I’m also on sabbatical at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado,

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Nonlinear and Stochastic Climate Dynamics

– Review by André April, Canadian Ice Service, Ottawa –

Edited by Christian L. E. Franzke and Terence J. O`Kane, Cambridge University Press 2017, Hardcover, 432 pages, ISBN 9781107118140, $177.95 –

Nonlinear multiscale processes drive the climate system, where memory effects or stochastic forcing interact to shape the behaviour of climate regimes.

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A Piece of History: The Canadian Chronometric Radiosonde

– By Kenneth A. Devine –

While temperature profiles to the tropopause had been conducted in Canada for research purposes starting in 1911 (Devine & Strong, 2009), operational upper air systems did not become available until 1929 with the introduction of the radiosonde which had a built in radio transmitter. The radiosonde gave the meteorologist a three dimensional view in real time

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Photograph of the Curiosity rover on Mars

Watching the Dust and Clouds Lazily Float by During a Martian Summer

– By J.E. Moores, C.L. Smith and C.L. Campbell, York University –

A scientific rover named Curiosity has been trundling around on Mars for the past 5 years, taking images of the atmosphere to look at cloud and dust. Because of data constraints, our group at York University get about 12 minutes of time every week or so. Imagine trying to understand the weather by looking at only one section of the sky once a week through a toilet paper tube!

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