LIghtening striking water with a boat on the horizon.

WMO presents top scientific prize to CMOS’ Gordon McBean

The World Meteorological Organization has presented its top award to Gordon McBean of Canada for his outstanding work in meteorology and climatology and his leadership as a scientific researcher. Dr McBean is currently President of the International Council for Science. The IMO Prize is the equivalent of the Nobel prize for meteorology. Established in 1955 and named after the predecessor of the WMO, the International Meteorological Organization (IMO), it is awarded every year by WMO Executive Council.

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Crop of the en plein air painting by Phil Chadwick, EcoArtists Article, "Morning on the Grand Chute"

EcoArtists: Reconnecting People to the Beauty of Nature

– By Sarah Knight, Bulletin Editor, and Phil Chadwick, Artist and Meteorologist –

I recently had the pleasure to chat with CMOS member Phil Chadwick at the CMOS congress in Halifax. Phil is a retired meteorologist and a prolific and well-known plein air artist, whose work is very much inspired by Canada’s own Group of Seven. Through his active involvement in the art community with other plein air painters, Phil is observing the power of artists to re-engage a disconnected population with the beauty of nature.

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Photo shows a field with bails of hay and setting sun in the distance

Climate and weather information for healthy, resilient Canadians and communities

– By Katie Hayes, PhD Candidate, University of Toronto and Research Affiliate, Health Canada; Peter Berry, Climate Change and Innovation Bureau, Health Canada; Toni Morris-Oswald, Office of Disaster Management, Manitoba Health; Dave Henderson, Health and Air Quality Services, Environment and Climate Change Canada –

Climate change is affecting health and well-being of people around the globe and the risks to human health and well-being are increasing.

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Image shows a snowy tree filled landscape with the setting sun on the horizon

CMOS helping scientists to be heard

– By Paul Kushner, Department of Physics at the University of Toronto and Vice-President of CMOS –

Media coverage of climate change plays a significant part in shaping public perceptions and attitudes, and in garnering support for continued scientific research into this pressing, global issue. As such, it is crucially important that facts and legitimate expert opinions are readily available,

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Photo shows a projection of the climate clock on the side of a building for the article by Samantha Mailhot for the CMOS Bulletin.

Climate Clock: Running Out of Time?

– By Samantha Mailhot –

Climate change is an increasingly urgent issue, with a significant amount of people working towards mitigation. However, the majority of the global population is not yet actively participating in climate action. This inaction may be due to several factors,

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Canada Needs Sustained Climate Research Funding

– By Jon Abbatt, Jim Drummond, Roger Francois, Paul Kushner, Paul Myers, Kimberly Strong, Laxmi Sushama, Phillipe Tortell –

As members of a community that works with climate-related measurements and models on a day-to-day basis, we know from first-hand experience that our understanding of the fundamental science that goes into atmospheric and climate model predictions

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Nonlinear and Stochastic Climate Dynamics

– Review by André April, Canadian Ice Service, Ottawa –

Edited by Christian L. E. Franzke and Terence J. O`Kane, Cambridge University Press 2017, Hardcover, 432 pages, ISBN 9781107118140, $177.95 –

Nonlinear multiscale processes drive the climate system, where memory effects or stochastic forcing interact to shape the behaviour of climate regimes.

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Image shows a bird's eye view of a large city, with the sun rising at the horizon.

Adaptation to Global Warming: Inevitable, Prepare Now*

– By John Hollins –

Attention by civil society and governments to global warming in the 1990’s was a sequel to action on both acidic precipitation and depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. The latter issues had been addressed, with some success, by adopting the strategy of reducing the emissions of the limited number of industries that caused the problems. The same approach was applied to global warming. This was a mistake

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