Seasonal Outlook for the winter 2018/19 (DJF) based on the official CanSIPS forecast issued on the 30th Nov. 2018

– By M. Markovic, B. Merryfield, K. Gauthier, M. Alarie, Environment and Climate Change Canada –

Seasonal Outlook (December, January, February) for 2018/19 temperature and precipitation in Canada includes a cooler winter in the Hudson Bay region, a warmer one all along the west coast and up in to Canada’s North, and near normal precipitation levels for much of the country.

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A Look at Ontario’s Climate of the Future with the Ontario Climate Data Portal (OCDP)

– by Huaiping Zhu1, Ziwang Deng1, Jinliang Liu2, Xin Qiu3, Xiaoyu Chen1, Xiaolan Zhou1

Climate change is undeniable, and scientists around the world agree that in the coming decades the effects of a warming planet are only going to become more and more felt. What does climate change mean for Ontario? The development of the Ontario Climate Data Portal (OCDP)

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Image shows a red and white wind sock against a cloudy sky. Photo for the Wind at Lake Saint Charles article by Richard Leduc

Comparison of wind forecasts and observations at Lake Saint-Charles, Quebec

– By Richard Leduc and Maude Chartrand, Geography Department, Université Laval

Lake Saint-Charles is the main source of drinking water for nearly 300,000 citizens of Quebec City’s and other municipalities. For several years obvious signs of accelerated aging of the water body were noticed, one of the symptoms of which is the appearance and recurrence (since 2006) of episodes of potentially toxic cyanobacterial water blooms.

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The Passing of Morley Thomas 1918-2018

– By David Phillips, Climatologist and Author –

Morley Thomas, affectionately known as Canada’s Mr. Climatology, died on March 31, 2018 in Watford, ON a few weeks after a fall and successful surgery on a broken hip. International meteorology lost a leader and skillful diplomat; Canadian meteorology lost a staunch and vigorous supporter over 65 years; and I lost a dear friend and remarkably generous mentor.

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CMOS Congress 2018 in Halifax, scenes from the poster session.

Highlights from the 52nd Annual CMOS Congress in Halifax

– By Heather Desserud, CMOS 2018 Local Organizing Committee, Halifax –

Earlier this month, the 52nd Annual Congress took place in the beautiful seaside city of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Attendees from across Canada and around the world gathered in the new downtown Convention Centre during June 10-14, participating in scientific programming and enjoying East Coast hospitality.

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EON-ROSE: Integrating Climate Science and Earth science

– By K.J.E., Boggs1, P., Audet2, D.W., Eaton3, M. Fayek4, J.T., Freymueller5, R.D., Hyndman6, T. James6, P.J., Kushner7, P. Myers8, M.G., Sideris3, P. Sullivan9, and M. Ulmi6

Across the globe, climate change, population growth, natural hazards and the need for long term sustainability of resource supply (including materials, energy and food) demand new approaches to Earth System Sciences.

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LIghtening striking water with a boat on the horizon.

WMO presents top scientific prize to CMOS’ Gordon McBean

The World Meteorological Organization has presented its top award to Gordon McBean of Canada for his outstanding work in meteorology and climatology and his leadership as a scientific researcher. Dr McBean is currently President of the International Council for Science. The IMO Prize is the equivalent of the Nobel prize for meteorology. Established in 1955 and named after the predecessor of the WMO, the International Meteorological Organization (IMO), it is awarded every year by WMO Executive Council.

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Crop of the en plein air painting by Phil Chadwick, EcoArtists Article, "Morning on the Grand Chute"

EcoArtists: Reconnecting People to the Beauty of Nature

– By Sarah Knight, Bulletin Editor, and Phil Chadwick, Artist and Meteorologist –

I recently had the pleasure to chat with CMOS member Phil Chadwick at the CMOS congress in Halifax. Phil is a retired meteorologist and a prolific and well-known plein air artist, whose work is very much inspired by Canada’s own Group of Seven. Through his active involvement in the art community with other plein air painters, Phil is observing the power of artists to re-engage a disconnected population with the beauty of nature.

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