– By Donald Reid and Douglas Bancroft, Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility (CSSF) –

The Canadian Coast Guard’s ability to support Canadian Ocean Science with ship time and facilities has been and will continue to decline even after the anticipated new science ships enter service in the coming years. It is hoped that this could be alleviated with the upcoming delivery of the versatile Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships to the Royal Canadian Navy beginning in 2018.

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Photograph of the UBC Glider in the water, used for the study of baleen whale habitats of Roseway Basin, NS. Glider is a long yellow tube, with wings and a tail fin. It is shown floating just beneath the surface of the water.

– By T. Howatt(1) T. Ross(2), S. Waterman(1); 1: University of British Columbia, 2: Institute of Ocean Sciences –

Canadian coastal waters are interspersed with baleen whale habitats, some of which are well known and protected, while others have yet to be identified and characterized.

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Image shows a bird's eye view of a large city, with the sun rising at the horizon.

– By John Hollins –

Attention by civil society and governments to global warming in the 1990’s was a sequel to action on both acidic precipitation and depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. The latter issues had been addressed, with some success, by adopting the strategy of reducing the emissions of the limited number of industries that caused the problems. The same approach was applied to global warming. This was a mistake

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– By Ben Moore-Maley(1), Debby Ianson(2), Susan Allen(1); 1: Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia; 2: Institute of Ocean Sciences, Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada –

Growth of the BC shellfish aquaculture industry has fallen behind the provincial government’s 1997 projections. While the impact of farming density is under investigation, changes in carbonate chemistry due to ocean acidification have been shown to reduce growth and survival, particularly in juvenile shellfish.

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Photograph to accompany the CMOS presidents message. Photo is taken from the surface of an open body of water, with a setting sun in the background

– By Wayne Richardson, P.Eng., CMOS President –

In 1980, I left my job in Toronto as a Senior Environmental Scientist with the Ontario Ministry of Environment and moved to Ottawa to join the Water Pollution Control Directorate in Environment Canada (EC). Over the years, I had many opportunities to move out of government, but I always chose to pursue the tremendous science and technology opportunities that presented themselves to a young environmental entrepreneur.

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– Review by Edward Lozowski, Professor Emeritus, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta –

Book by Geoff Strong, Published by Geoff Strong, Paperback 246 pages ISBN 978-0-9952883-0-0, $19.99

Convenient Mistruths is a semi-fictional thriller, based on the very real possibility that offshore drilling in the Arctic could release large volumes of stored methane in the form of methane clathrates.

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– By Kenneth A. Devine –

While temperature profiles to the tropopause had been conducted in Canada for research purposes starting in 1911 (Devine & Strong, 2009), operational upper air systems did not become available until 1929 with the introduction of the radiosonde which had a built in radio transmitter. The radiosonde gave the meteorologist a three dimensional view in real time

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For previous issues go to the Archives page on the main CMOS site.

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