Ice: Nature and Culture

– Review by Bob Jones, CMOS Archivist –

By Klaus Dodds, Published by Reaktion Books, distributed by University of Chicago Press, Paperback, 229 pages, ISBN-13: 978-1-78023-905-7, $ 24.95 (USD)

Ice is not a science textbook about ice, nor is it a manual of Ice Forecasting (the reviewer will know as he was an Ice Forecaster with the Meteorological Service of Canada in a former life). Rather it is a wide-ranging exploration of the cultural, natural and geopolitical history of ice.

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Image shows a red and white wind sock against a cloudy sky. Photo for the Wind at Lake Saint Charles article by Richard Leduc

– By Richard Leduc and Maude Chartrand, Geography Department, Université Laval

Lake Saint-Charles is the main source of drinking water for nearly 300,000 citizens of Quebec City’s and other municipalities. For several years obvious signs of accelerated aging of the water body were noticed, one of the symptoms of which is the appearance and recurrence (since 2006) of episodes of potentially toxic cyanobacterial water blooms.

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– By K.J.E., Boggs1, P., Audet2, D.W., Eaton3, M. Fayek4, J.T., Freymueller5, R.D., Hyndman6, T. James6, P.J., Kushner7, P. Myers8, M.G., Sideris3, P. Sullivan9, and M. Ulmi6

Across the globe, climate change, population growth, natural hazards and the need for long term sustainability of resource supply (including materials, energy and food) demand new approaches to Earth System Sciences.

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Microscopic image of different kinds of pollen. Some are small and round, others are larger and with spikes.

Pollen, Chemistry and Clouds

– By Ellen Gute, Abbatt Research Group, University of Toronto –

Clouds are a crucial part of our Earth’s atmosphere as they redistribute water resources and contribute to the atmosphere’s radiative forcing (Pruppacher and Klett 1997; Lohmann 2006). Ice is present in many clouds and is known to play a central role in precipitation formation. Despite the important role in climate, processes associated with clouds represent some of the largest uncertainties in climate models

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Banner image for The Lunar Atmosphere article by Paul Godin and all. Image shows a moon setting on the ocean, black and white image.

– By Paul Godin, Jacob Kloos, Tue Giang Nguyen, Jasmeer Sangha, and John Moores, Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering, York University

The moon has been and still is an area of great interest in the field of planetary sciences. Because its atmosphere is extremely thin (typically, you will find no more than one million molecules per cubic centimeter,

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Crop of the en plein air painting by Phil Chadwick, EcoArtists Article, "Morning on the Grand Chute"

– By Sarah Knight, Bulletin Editor, and Phil Chadwick, Artist and Meteorologist –

I recently had the pleasure to chat with CMOS member Phil Chadwick at the CMOS congress in Halifax. Phil is a retired meteorologist and a prolific and well-known plein air artist, whose work is very much inspired by Canada’s own Group of Seven. Through his active involvement in the art community with other plein air painters, Phil is observing the power of artists to re-engage a disconnected population with the beauty of nature.

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The Passing of Morley Thomas 1918-2018

– By David Phillips, Climatologist and Author –

Morley Thomas, affectionately known as Canada’s Mr. Climatology, died on March 31, 2018 in Watford, ON a few weeks after a fall and successful surgery on a broken hip. International meteorology lost a leader and skillful diplomat; Canadian meteorology lost a staunch and vigorous supporter over 65 years; and I lost a dear friend and remarkably generous mentor.

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– By Jim Young, RWDI and Jim Young Atmospheric Services Inc. –

Summer is here with its long warm days and clear nights, for a lot of the time. And what could be better than an atmospheric phenomenon or two to point out to your friends. You may become the hit of an evening beach party.

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