Close up photograph of the eyes of an oyster toad fish.

– A Campbell Scientific advertising feature –

“What caused this unexpected spike in my data?”
“My sensor is offline – did something knock it over?”
“If only I could see for myself what the current conditions are.”
“I wish I had visuals to support the story the data is telling me.”

Anyone monitoring their environment has thought something like this at one time or another,

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– By J. Hamilton, M. Pittman, R. Pettipas, K. Phelan, S. Nudds, C. Richards, J. Barthelotte; Ocean and Ecosystem Sciences Division, DFO, Bedford Institute of Oceanography –

Oceanographic data delivered in real time can provide useful input to constrain and verify numerical models being used for ocean forecasting. Real time data from strategic locations can also be useful to marine operators whose activities may be impacted by local oceanographic conditions.

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– By P. Odon, G. West, R. Stull; EOAS, University of British Columbia –

The fall and winter seasons of 2016/17 were noteworthy for the cold, wet weather they brought to regions of British Columbia (BC). Although all of BC experienced some impacts, the South Coast region saw particularly large impacts from an exceptionally wet fall that quickly transitioned into a persistently cold, snowy winter.

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Photograph of the Curiosity rover on Mars

– By J.E. Moores, C.L. Smith and C.L. Campbell, York University –

A scientific rover named Curiosity has been trundling around on Mars for the past 5 years, taking images of the atmosphere to look at cloud and dust. Because of data constraints, our group at York University get about 12 minutes of time every week or so. Imagine trying to understand the weather by looking at only one section of the sky once a week through a toilet paper tube!

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© 2017 Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society