2020-2021 Arctic Winter Seasonal Climate Outlook for Temperature and Precipitation

– By contributors from Environment and Climate Change Canada, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (Russia), Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia, the Norwegian Meteorological Institute, the Finnish Meteorological Institute, World Meteorological Organization, Climate Prediction Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (USA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, International Arctic Research Center (IARC, USA) –

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2021 CMOS Congress – Call for Session Proposals

Dear CMOS member or past Congress participant,

The Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS) 55th Congress will be held 31 May to 11 June, 2021, hosted by the Vancouver Island Centre. The Congress will be held using a virtual (on-line) format, extending over a longer period, 9-10 days, with reduced hours each day to accommodate multiple time zones.

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2020-2021 Arctic Winter Seasonal Climate Outlook for Sea Ice

– By contributors from Environment and Climate Change Canada, University of Quebec at Montreal, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, The Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Finnish Meteorological Institute, World Meteorological Organization, Climate Prediction Centre of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the International Arctic Research Center –

Arctic Climate Forum Consensus Statement

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An Update on CMOS’s 2021 Virtual Congress

Update 9 November 2020

1. The 2021 Congress will be entirely on-line, over the 2-week period: 31 May – 12 June. To accommodate different time zones across Canada, the daily conference hours will be shorter: 0800-1300h Pacific Time; 1100h-1600 Eastern Time.

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Remembering Louis Fortier

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Dr. Louis Fortier in Quebec City, on the 4th of October at the age of 66, following a courageous fight against leukemia. He was the son of Pierre Fortier (1923-2012) and Louise Roy (1925-1989).

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2020 Arctic Summer Seasonal Climate Outlook for Sea-Ice

– By contributors from Environment and Climate Change Canada, the University of Québec at Montréal, the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, the Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia, The Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Finnish Meteorological Institute, World Meteorological Organization, Climate Prediction Center, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration –

Arctic Climate Forum Consensus Statement (Continued)

Highlights

Warmer than normal surface air temperatures over Eurasia and the Arctic Ocean contributed to below to near normal ice conditions during the 2019-2020 winter across the entire Arctic.

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2020 Arctic Summer Seasonal Climate Outlook for Temperature and Precipitation

– By contributors from Environment and Climate Change Canada, the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, the Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia, The Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Finnish Meteorological Institute, World Meteorological Organization, Climate Prediction Center, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration –

Arctic Climate Forum Consensus Statement

And Summary of the 2020 Arctic Winter Season

CONTEXT

Arctic temperatures continue to warm at more than twice the global mean. Annual surface air temperatures over the last 4 years (2016–2019) in the Arctic (60°–85°N) have been the highest in the time series of observations for 1936-2019.

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Man on a research vessel directing a part of the vessel

Modular Ocean Research Infrastructure (MORI): A Flexible, Scalable and Affordable Approach to Ocean-going Research in Canada and Worldwide

– By Dr. Doug Wallace (Scientific Director, MEOPAR) and Doug Bancroft (President and CEO, Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility)–

Research vessels (RVs) remain critical infrastructure for many classes of ocean-related research. Robots and autonomous vehicles are used increasingly for monitoring and some process-oriented research when appropriate sensors are available. However, there are also a growing number of questions related to ocean and seafloor resources, as well as complex physical, chemical, biological and atmospheric processes critical to climate change and biodiversity, which require that multidisciplinary teams of researchers can access the ocean with highly sophisticated instrumentation, from vessels.

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