Burning Souls

– Review by Frank Johnson, President, Ottawa Instrumentation Ltd –

By David Chernushenko, Published by Green & Gold Inc, paperback, 670 pages, ISBN 978-1-9991138-0-3 $30.00 (CAD).

Into the burgeoning field of climate change novels we receive Burning Souls, by former Ottawa City Councillor David Chernushenko. This book is different. Do not pick it up unless you’re prepared to stay up late finishing it.

Continue reading

Replacement of the Canadian Weather Radar Network

– by Sylvain Laramée, Qian Li, Pat Wong, Sylvain Savard, Peter Leibiuk, Steven Brady, Rick Czepita, Hamid Nasr, Todd Benko, Michael Romaniuk, Mark Abt and Ingrid Wong –

Canadian Weather Radar Replacement Program, Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Meteorologists use many tools to forecast Canada’s weather. Among which, radar is a primary tool that provides 3D observations of the atmosphere with high temporal and spatial resolution to assist in forecasting short-term severe weather events such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, ice storms and blizzards.

Continue reading

Haowen Qin, Budding Meteorologist and CMOS’ Youngest Member

– An Interview by CMOS Bulletin Editor, Sarah Knight –

At 17-years old, Haowen Qin is an incredibly passionate and knowledgeable budding meteorologist, and is CMOS’ youngest member to date. I recently had the opportunity to interview Haowen, at the urgings of our very own Prof. Douw Steyn who has been mentoring this young man and has seen what his curiosity, intelligence and drive are capable of. Read the quite remarkable story of Haowen’s relationship with meteorology,

Continue reading

Updated CMOS Position Statement on Climate Change

The process of revising the CMOS position statement on climate change:

In August 2019, the CMOS Council approved a revised position statement on climate change. The previous statement dated from 2014 and important developments in the science of climate change had occurred in the intervening years. In particular, the 2018 release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Special Report on 1.5 C

Continue reading

Message from the CMOS President for August 2019: Working for Our Members, So They Can Work for Science

– By Kimberly Strong, CMOS President and Professor & Chair, Department of Physics, University of Toronto –

The news is awash with stories of ongoing, climate-related disasters from the tropics to the Arctic. On the date that I write this, the Amazon rainforest is seeing wildfires raging at a rate well beyond normal. With the dry season running until October, there is no immediate end in sight,

Continue reading

Climate in the Age of Empire: Weather Observers in Colonial Canada

– Review by Richard Leduc, Ph.D., AirMet Science Inc., rleduc@airmetscience.com –

By Victoria C. Slonosky, Published by the American Meteorological Society, paperback, 288 pages, ISBN 9781944970208, $45.00

The material in this book is abundant. I have read many sections of the book and each is very detailed and contains many anecdotes, facts, and examples that supplement the topics covered and are tied to historical facts. Dr. J. F. Gaultier’s contribution to the early days of the colony is impressive, and Slonosky’s book shines in highlighting it, and the contribution of Smallwood, McCord and many others. The author also introduces the issue of climate change that preoccupied these pioneers,

Continue reading

Verner Suomi – The life and work of the founder of satellite meteorology

– Review by Lewis Poulin –

By John M. Lewis, Published by the American Meteorological Society, paperback, 168 pages, ISBN 9781944970222, $30.00 (USD)

– “Processing satellite data is like taking a drink from a fire hose” – Verner Suomi –

I was looking forward to doing this review. I love biographies and I’m working now with GOES-16/17 data which has been made possible by Verner Suomi’s early work in satellite meteorology.

Continue reading

Women in Meteorology in Canada: The Early Days

– By Rebecca Milo –

In 2017, the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS) celebrated its 50th anniversary. Spurred by that, CMOS decided to look back at the early days of women in meteorology. Their history is tied to the advancement of women in the workforce and their achievement of equal status in the workplace. With regard to gender equality in general, it was only the 1929 decision of the Judicial Council of Britain’s Privy Council, Canada’s highest court at the time, when women were legally recognized as “persons” under British common law.

Continue reading

  • 1
  • 2
  • 9

For previous issues go to the Archives page on the main CMOS site.

© 2017 Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society

Designed & powered by Creative Carbon