As climate science researchers and educators, we need to do more for our students than just teach them about their dismal futures

– By Dr. Heather Short –

I resigned from my tenured position teaching climate science at a small college in August of this year. It wasn’t to take a better job offer, or to use as a bargaining chip for better pay; it was an act of conscientious objection to an educational system that is preparing students for a future that will not exist. Students are climate-crisis-fatigued, angry, confused, hopeless, and often in denial because the world outside of the classroom is in denial.

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CMOS Bulletin Solidarity Statement with Wet’suwet’en land defenders

The CMOS Bulletin stands in solidarity with members of the Wet’suwet’en Nation as they peacefully defend their unceded territories in the face of militarized police action, raids and arrests by armed RCMP officers. As a science communications platform that exists for the advancement of climatology, meteorology and oceanography in a time of climate emergency, the Bulletin understands our specific responsibility to support Indigenous peoples’ efforts to protect their lands, waters and peoples against the expansion of fossil fuel infrastructure.

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A field laboratory class from home to study snow characteristics

– By Julie Mireille Thériault, Émilie Gauthier, Mathieu Lachapelle and René Laprise –

Learning atmospheric sciences

A degree in atmospheric sciences can lead to a variety of professions such as weather forecaster, climate analyst, field measurement specialist or a career in communications.

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The Weather Forecast Research Team: A Nexus of Operational Weather Forecasting and Research in Western Canada

– By Julia Jeworrek, Dr. Rosie Howard and Prof. Roland B. Stull –

Foundations

In 1995, the Weather Forecast Research Team (WFRT) [1] was formed by Prof. Roland Stull at UBC with four Ph.D. students. Living in the complex mountainous and coastal terrain of British Columbia (BC; Fig. 1a), Prof. Stull witnessed the challenges involved in making accurate forecasts for western Canada.

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CoCoRaHS Precipitation Network

– By Rick Fleetwood –

CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain Hail and Snow) is a volunteer network of mostly community members and organizations (e.g. watershed groups, conservation authorities, agriculture organizations, etc.) that measure and report precipitation daily through the CoCoRaHS website or Smartphone App.

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