Author: CMOS Bulletin SCMO

Canada’s Changing Climate Report (CCCR)

Scientists from Environment and Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Natural Resources Canada, and university experts collaborated to produce Canada’s Changing Climate Report (CCCR). Released at the beginning of April, this report is about why Canada’s climate has changed, how it is changing, and what changes the future holds. This document is the first of a series to be released as part of a National Assessment to look at the impacts of climate change on Canadians and possible adaptation measures. It covers changes across Canada in temperature, precipitation, climate extremes, snow, ice, permafrost, freshwater availability, and sea level and other changes to our oceans.

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satellite map of the world banner image for weathercasters story

Canadian Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators

– By Bronwyn McIlroy-Young, Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability, University of British Columbia –

Canadians are increasingly looking for information about how their community is being affected by climate change. New research reveals that TV weathercasters could be very effective at informing the public about what climate change is and how it is transforming local environments across Canada.

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Supporting the Next Generation of Arctic Researchers

– By Chantal Mears, Dalhousie University, Halifax –

I had the pleasure of chatting with Dalhousie undergraduate student Chantal Mears at the 2018 CMOS Congress in Halifax. Chantal went on to win the ASL Environmental Sciences Best Student Poster prize (for her poster titled: Using 226Ra and 228Ra isotopes to distinguish water mass distribution in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago) at the congress, and I was not surprised. She is a great communicator and full of passion for her studies, and for working to support a better understanding of our oceans. Here, Chantal tells us a bit about the important work that she is involved with in understanding ocean dynamics in the Canadian Arctic.

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Message from the CMOS President for February 2019: Advancing Climate Action in Canada

– By Paul Kushner, Professor, Department of Physics, University of Toronto and CMOS President –

At the end of February I was grateful for the special opportunity to participate in the National Climate Change Science and Knowledge Priorities Workshop in Ottawa, a well-organized event hosted by Environment and Climate Change Canada. The workshop brought together a wide variety of experts and stakeholders from the natural and social sciences; from First Peoples, federal, provincial and municipal organizations; and from NGOs and industry.

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Perspective: Should CMOS be Communicating More to Canadians on Climate Change?

– By John Loder, Scientist Emeritus, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography –

Our Society’s Bulletin and website indicate that CMOS “exists for the advancement of meteorology and oceanography in Canada”. Is this advancement primarily for the benefit of our members, such as improved communications internally or increased funding for our core disciplines? Or, should CMOS also have an emphasis on communicating sound scientific information to the Canadian public, especially on major issues involving our expertise and affecting present and future generations?

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Seasonal Outlook for the spring 2019 (MAM) based on the official CanSIPS forecast issued on the 28th Feb. 2019

– By M. Markovic, B. Merryfield, M. Alarie, Environment and Climate Change Canada –

Seasonal Outlook for spring 2019 (March, April, May) in Canada includes warmer temperatures in Eastern Canada and Northern Canada, and cooler ones across the central prairies and in to BC. There are currently weak El Niño conditions in the central equatorial Pacific that are forecast to persist throughout the spring 2019.

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banner image showing 3 maps of a seasonal forecast for north america based on CanSIPS and CFSv2 combined forecasts.

The White Space Project: A Geographically Continuous Seasonal Forecast for North America

– By Marko Markovic1, Zeng-Zhen Hu2, Bertrand Denis1, Arun Kumar2 and Dave DeWitt2

(1) Environment and Climate Change Canada, Meteorological Service of Canada, 2121 Transcanada Highway, Dorval, Canada; (2) Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/NWS/NCEP, College Park, Maryland, USA.

The CanSIPS-CFSv2 seasonal forecast, or “The White Space Project,” is a joint effort by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to deliver a geographically continuous seasonal forecast over the North American continent.

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Working Together for the Arctic: The Arctic Regional Climate Centre Network (ArcRCC)

– by Michael Crowe, Katherine Wilson, and John Parker –

The effects of climate change are being felt around the world, but nowhere as intensely and as obviously as in the Arctic. Many sources can be cited that put the rate of temperature increase in the Arctic over the last 30-50 years as at least twice that over the rest of the globe. These temperature increases have led to significant reductions of sea ice, thawing permafrost and coastal erosion that affect all Northerners, including Indigenous communities and industry.

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