Author: CMOS Bulletin SCMO

The Ice at the End of the World

– Review by Phil Chadwick, Meteorologist and Eco-Artist –

By Jon Gertner, Published by Penguin Random House, Hardcover, 448 pages, ISBN 9780812996623, $28.00 (USD)

You can’t make this stuff up! In fact, hard data and science might be the best things to really believe. “The Ice at the End of the World” is a terrific read. Historians and scientists, as well as anyone concerned about the future of the planet, would find this book fascinating.

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In Memoriam: Wayne Evans

Dr. Wayne Evans, Adjunct Professor in the Centre for Research in Earth and Space Science (CRESS) at York University from 1976 onwards, passed away in Seattle, Washington on April 27th, 2019. Although he never held a faculty position at York, during his time at Environment Canada and Trent University he maintained continued collaborations with CRESS, and contributed a great deal to its research activities.

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Message from the CMOS President for April 2019: Building Resilience to Climate Change, with Grace under Pressure

– By Paul Kushner, Professor, Department of Physics, University of Toronto and CMOS President –

The warnings started in mid April: a deep and rapidly melting central/eastern Canadian snowpack and many days of intensive rain were set to bring unprecedented flooding to riverfront communities across Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Ottawa River water levels smashed previous records set during the flooding in spring of 2017.

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Photo shows a smiliing Bob Kochtubajda, caucasian man, balding with glasses, for his article on the 2014 wildfire season in the NWT

Extreme 2014 wildfire season in the Northwest Territories

– By Bob Kochtubajda1, Ron Stewart2, Mike Flannigan3, Barrie Bonsal1, Charles Cuell4, and Curtis Mooney1

1. Environment and Climate Change Canada; 2. University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB; 3. University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; 4. CHMR Climate Resilience Consulting, Kaslo, BC.

Media reports around the world have highlighted the extreme and unprecedented nature of wildfires in recent years (e.g. Chile 2017, Portugal 2017, Greece 2018, California 2017 and 2018). In Canada, the 2016 Fort McMurray wildfire was the third largest in Alberta’s history and became the costliest natural disaster in Canadian history,

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Canada’s Changing Climate Report (CCCR)

Scientists from Environment and Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Natural Resources Canada, and university experts collaborated to produce Canada’s Changing Climate Report (CCCR). Released at the beginning of April, this report is about why Canada’s climate has changed, how it is changing, and what changes the future holds. This document is the first of a series to be released as part of a National Assessment to look at the impacts of climate change on Canadians and possible adaptation measures. It covers changes across Canada in temperature, precipitation, climate extremes, snow, ice, permafrost, freshwater availability, and sea level and other changes to our oceans.

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satellite map of the world banner image for weathercasters story

Canadian Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators

– By Bronwyn McIlroy-Young, Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability, University of British Columbia –

Canadians are increasingly looking for information about how their community is being affected by climate change. New research reveals that TV weathercasters could be very effective at informing the public about what climate change is and how it is transforming local environments across Canada.

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