The troposphere is expanding due to anthropogenic climate change

– By Jane Liu, Lingyun Meng, David W. Tarasick, William J. Randel, Andrea K. Steiner, Hallgeir Wilhelmsen, Lei Wang, Leopold Haimberger, and Wayne K. Hocking –

The tropopause is a transition between the troposphere and the stratosphere above it. Air temperature decreases with altitude from the surface to the tropopause because the surface is a heat source, while above the tropopause, air temperature increases with altitude because the ozone layer in the middle stratosphere is a second heat source. In other words, the tropopause is an altitude where temperature typically reaches a minimum. In some special cases, temperature decreases with altitude again above the tropopause, and then increases with altitude, forming a second tropopause. Rarely, a third tropopause can be formed. Here we only consider the first tropopause.

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A field laboratory class from home to study snow characteristics

– By Julie Mireille Thériault, Émilie Gauthier, Mathieu Lachapelle and René Laprise –

Learning atmospheric sciences

A degree in atmospheric sciences can lead to a variety of professions such as weather forecaster, climate analyst, field measurement specialist or a career in communications.

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Feather Frost or Frost Flowers (Crystallofolia)

– By Douw Steyn, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. –

The attached photographs show an instance of the rare phenomenon of feather frost on a stick. There were instances of this kind of frost all over the forest floor, but only on sticks, logs and stumps, and apparently none on still-living plants.

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Canada’s Top Ten Weather Stories of 2020

– By David Phillips –

This article was first published by Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Prologue 2020

Canada is warming at nearly twice the global rate with parts of western and northern Canada warming three or four times the global average. Sea ice in the North is thinning and shrinking, and our unique ice shelves are crumbling into pieces. While Canada is still the snowiest country, less snow is falling across the south. White Christmases’ are less frequent and less white.

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Black History Month for the Sciences

On May 25, 2020, Amy Cooper—a white Canadian woman—called the police on Christan Cooper—a black birdwatcher—after he asked her to leash her dog in an on-leash part of Central Park, New York City. From this incident rose Black Birders Week, an event organized by BlackAFinSTEM with the goal of increasing the viability of Black scientists in natural sciences and of highlighting the unique challenges and dangers faced by Black folks participating in outdoor activities.

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2021 CMOS Congress – Call for Session Proposals

Dear CMOS member or past Congress participant,

The Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS) 55th Congress will be held 31 May to 11 June, 2021, hosted by the Vancouver Island Centre. The Congress will be held using a virtual (on-line) format, extending over a longer period, 9-10 days, with reduced hours each day to accommodate multiple time zones.

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Micrometeorological Variables and Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Two Climate Regions of Quebec

– By Richard Leduc, Ph.D., AirMet Science Inc., and Jean-François Brière, Ministère de l’Environnement et de la Lutte contre les changements climatiques

The US-EPA (2019a) AERMOD dispersion model is widely used to assess the concentration of contaminants in ambient air as a result of emissions from a source. To this end, AERMOD requires micrometeorological variables characterizing turbulence (u*, w*, L, zic, zim); they are calculated by the AERMET module and obtained using local surface and upper air data (wind, temperature and cloud opacity),

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