Feather Frost or Frost Flowers (Crystallofolia)

– By Douw Steyn, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. –

The attached photographs show an instance of the rare phenomenon of feather frost on a stick. There were instances of this kind of frost all over the forest floor, but only on sticks, logs and stumps, and apparently none on still-living plants.

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Canada’s Top Ten Weather Stories of 2020

– By David Phillips –

This article was first published by Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Prologue 2020

Canada is warming at nearly twice the global rate with parts of western and northern Canada warming three or four times the global average. Sea ice in the North is thinning and shrinking, and our unique ice shelves are crumbling into pieces. While Canada is still the snowiest country, less snow is falling across the south. White Christmases’ are less frequent and less white.

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Black History Month for the Sciences

On May 25, 2020, Amy Cooper—a white Canadian woman—called the police on Christan Cooper—a black birdwatcher—after he asked her to leash her dog in an on-leash part of Central Park, New York City. From this incident rose Black Birders Week, an event organized by BlackAFinSTEM with the goal of increasing the viability of Black scientists in natural sciences and of highlighting the unique challenges and dangers faced by Black folks participating in outdoor activities.

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2021 CMOS Congress – Call for Session Proposals

Dear CMOS member or past Congress participant,

The Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS) 55th Congress will be held 31 May to 11 June, 2021, hosted by the Vancouver Island Centre. The Congress will be held using a virtual (on-line) format, extending over a longer period, 9-10 days, with reduced hours each day to accommodate multiple time zones.

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Micrometeorological Variables and Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Two Climate Regions of Quebec

– By Richard Leduc, Ph.D., AirMet Science Inc., and Jean-François Brière, Ministère de l’Environnement et de la Lutte contre les changements climatiques

The US-EPA (2019a) AERMOD dispersion model is widely used to assess the concentration of contaminants in ambient air as a result of emissions from a source. To this end, AERMOD requires micrometeorological variables characterizing turbulence (u*, w*, L, zic, zim); they are calculated by the AERMET module and obtained using local surface and upper air data (wind, temperature and cloud opacity),

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skyscraper view of traffic lights and Vancouver tower

Air Pollution in the Time of COVID-19

– By D.G. Steyn, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., and Kyle Howe, Air Quality and Climate Change, Metro Vancouver Regional District, Burnaby, B.C. –

The COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting many aspects of society globally, nationally and locally. The most direct effect is the human health tragedy of increased morbidity and mortality caused by the disease. Beyond that, the legislated curtailment of human movement to slow the spread of the virus has resulted in economies being placed in what has been called a “medically induced coma”. Closely associated with the sharp slowdown in economic activity has been the reduction in fossil fuel consumption from most source sectors.

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Blue Sky Blues or the Three Degrees of Aircraft Pollution

– By Phil Chadwick –

The title of this 2012 painting below, numbered 1260 in my artistic journey, is “Three Degrees”. That title might sound cryptic. Let me explain.

All air traffic was grounded over North America for three or four days after the terror attacks of 9/11 on September 11th, 2001. A couple of curious meteorologists investigated the impact of grounding those aircraft. They discovered that the skies were much clearer and that temperatures responded correspondingly.

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Open pit mine at night with excavators

Toward Quantifying Area-fugitive Greenhouse Gas
(GHG) Emissions from Open-pit Mines

– By Amir Nazem, Md. Rafsan Nahian, Ryan Byerlay, Manoj K. Nambiar, and Amir A. Aliabadi-

Conventional techniques to quantify area-fugitive Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from an open-pit mine have serious drawbacks. The bottom-up approach is based on inventory estimates, in which the emissions from different stationary sources across a mining facility are combined. This approach does not include the atmospheric measurements of GHGs or meteorology and relies on assumptions of the strength of each GHG source within a facility that may not be up-to-date.

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