skyscraper view of traffic lights and Vancouver tower

Air Pollution in the Time of COVID-19

– By D.G. Steyn, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., and Kyle Howe, Air Quality and Climate Change, Metro Vancouver Regional District, Burnaby, B.C. –

The COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting many aspects of society globally, nationally and locally. The most direct effect is the human health tragedy of increased morbidity and mortality caused by the disease. Beyond that, the legislated curtailment of human movement to slow the spread of the virus has resulted in economies being placed in what has been called a “medically induced coma”. Closely associated with the sharp slowdown in economic activity has been the reduction in fossil fuel consumption from most source sectors.

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Blue Sky Blues or the Three Degrees of Aircraft Pollution

– By Phil Chadwick –

The title of this 2012 painting below, numbered 1260 in my artistic journey, is “Three Degrees”. That title might sound cryptic. Let me explain.

All air traffic was grounded over North America for three or four days after the terror attacks of 9/11 on September 11th, 2001. A couple of curious meteorologists investigated the impact of grounding those aircraft. They discovered that the skies were much clearer and that temperatures responded correspondingly.

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Open pit mine at night with excavators

Toward Quantifying Area-fugitive Greenhouse Gas
(GHG) Emissions from Open-pit Mines

– By Amir Nazem, Md. Rafsan Nahian, Ryan Byerlay, Manoj K. Nambiar, and Amir A. Aliabadi-

Conventional techniques to quantify area-fugitive Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from an open-pit mine have serious drawbacks. The bottom-up approach is based on inventory estimates, in which the emissions from different stationary sources across a mining facility are combined. This approach does not include the atmospheric measurements of GHGs or meteorology and relies on assumptions of the strength of each GHG source within a facility that may not be up-to-date.

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MOPITT – Measuring Pollution in the Troposphere for 20 Years

– By Prof. James R. Drummond, FRSC, Department of Physics & Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University –

Most scientific projects run for a few years and then the people involved move on to something else. The Measurements Of Pollution in The Troposphere (MOPITT) project has been running for over 30 years and on December 18th, 2019 we are celebrating the 20th anniversary of the launch of the MOPITT satellite instrument.

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Revitalization of UQAM Atmospheric Science Undergraduate Programme

– By René Laprise and Julie Mireille Theriault –

Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), laprise.rene@uqam.ca, theriault.julie@uqam.ca

The enrollments in Atmospheric Science (AS) programmes are rather low in Canadian universities, and the situation at UQAM is no exception. The low profitability of AS programmes threatens the long-term perspectives for training specialists in atmospheric-related fields.

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Radar Events Initiative

– By Phil Chadwick, Meteorologist and Eco-Artist –

Tenacity may be a good thing especially if it is well intentioned – the objective analysis of the weather services provided by Environment Canada. The following was written in 2004 to address some perceived deficiencies. The quality and quantity of radar were expanding and there were many imperative applications for that burgeoning information. The following were just a few of those and I had many more in the queue ready for implementation.

Now 15 years later I have not yet given up. A new generation of S-Band radars are being deployed across Canada offering much superior data that needs to be fully utilized as this 2004 research proposed.

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Haowen Qin, Budding Meteorologist and CMOS’ Youngest Member

– An Interview by CMOS Bulletin Editor, Sarah Knight –

At 17-years old, Haowen Qin is an incredibly passionate and knowledgeable budding meteorologist, and is CMOS’ youngest member to date. I recently had the opportunity to interview Haowen, at the urgings of our very own Prof. Douw Steyn who has been mentoring this young man and has seen what his curiosity, intelligence and drive are capable of. Read the quite remarkable story of Haowen’s relationship with meteorology,

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Verner Suomi – The life and work of the founder of satellite meteorology

– Review by Lewis Poulin –

By John M. Lewis, Published by the American Meteorological Society, paperback, 168 pages, ISBN 9781944970222, $30.00 (USD)

– “Processing satellite data is like taking a drink from a fire hose” – Verner Suomi –

I was looking forward to doing this review. I love biographies and I’m working now with GOES-16/17 data which has been made possible by Verner Suomi’s early work in satellite meteorology.

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For previous issues go to the Archives page on the main CMOS site.

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