Haowen Qin, Budding Meteorologist and CMOS’ Youngest Member

– An Interview by CMOS Bulletin Editor, Sarah Knight –

At 17-years old, Haowen Qin is an incredibly passionate and knowledgeable budding meteorologist, and is CMOS’ youngest member to date. I recently had the opportunity to interview Haowen, at the urgings of our very own Prof. Douw Steyn who has been mentoring this young man and has seen what his curiosity, intelligence and drive are capable of. Read the quite remarkable story of Haowen’s relationship with meteorology,

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Verner Suomi – The life and work of the founder of satellite meteorology

– Review by Lewis Poulin –

By John M. Lewis, Published by the American Meteorological Society, paperback, 168 pages, ISBN 9781944970222, $30.00 (USD)

– “Processing satellite data is like taking a drink from a fire hose” – Verner Suomi –

I was looking forward to doing this review. I love biographies and I’m working now with GOES-16/17 data which has been made possible by Verner Suomi’s early work in satellite meteorology.

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In Memoriam: Wayne Evans

Dr. Wayne Evans, Adjunct Professor in the Centre for Research in Earth and Space Science (CRESS) at York University from 1976 onwards, passed away in Seattle, Washington on April 27th, 2019. Although he never held a faculty position at York, during his time at Environment Canada and Trent University he maintained continued collaborations with CRESS, and contributed a great deal to its research activities.

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Photo shows a smiliing Bob Kochtubajda, caucasian man, balding with glasses, for his article on the 2014 wildfire season in the NWT

Extreme 2014 wildfire season in the Northwest Territories

– By Bob Kochtubajda1, Ron Stewart2, Mike Flannigan3, Barrie Bonsal1, Charles Cuell4, and Curtis Mooney1

1. Environment and Climate Change Canada; 2. University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB; 3. University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB; 4. CHMR Climate Resilience Consulting, Kaslo, BC.

Media reports around the world have highlighted the extreme and unprecedented nature of wildfires in recent years (e.g. Chile 2017, Portugal 2017, Greece 2018, California 2017 and 2018). In Canada, the 2016 Fort McMurray wildfire was the third largest in Alberta’s history and became the costliest natural disaster in Canadian history,

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banner image showing 3 maps of a seasonal forecast for north america based on CanSIPS and CFSv2 combined forecasts.

The White Space Project: A Geographically Continuous Seasonal Forecast for North America

– By Marko Markovic1, Zeng-Zhen Hu2, Bertrand Denis1, Arun Kumar2 and Dave DeWitt2

(1) Environment and Climate Change Canada, Meteorological Service of Canada, 2121 Transcanada Highway, Dorval, Canada; (2) Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/NWS/NCEP, College Park, Maryland, USA.

The CanSIPS-CFSv2 seasonal forecast, or “The White Space Project,” is a joint effort by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to deliver a geographically continuous seasonal forecast over the North American continent.

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William (Bill) Andrew Gault, 1939-2018

William (Bill) Andrew Gault was born in Ottawa on May 25, 1939 and received his B.Sc. from Carleton University in 1961. In 1967 he completed a thesis entitled “A Study of the Twilight Airglow Emissions of Sodium, Lithium, And Potassium”. His career was dedicated to the development of new instruments for the observation of the aurora and airglow

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Microscopic image of different kinds of pollen. Some are small and round, others are larger and with spikes.

Pollen, Chemistry and Clouds

– By Ellen Gute, Abbatt Research Group, University of Toronto –

Clouds are a crucial part of our Earth’s atmosphere as they redistribute water resources and contribute to the atmosphere’s radiative forcing (Pruppacher and Klett 1997; Lohmann 2006). Ice is present in many clouds and is known to play a central role in precipitation formation. Despite the important role in climate, processes associated with clouds represent some of the largest uncertainties in climate models

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