skyscraper view of traffic lights and Vancouver tower

Air Pollution in the Time of COVID-19

– By D.G. Steyn, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., and Kyle Howe, Air Quality and Climate Change, Metro Vancouver Regional District, Burnaby, B.C. –

The COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting many aspects of society globally, nationally and locally. The most direct effect is the human health tragedy of increased morbidity and mortality caused by the disease. Beyond that, the legislated curtailment of human movement to slow the spread of the virus has resulted in economies being placed in what has been called a “medically induced coma”. Closely associated with the sharp slowdown in economic activity has been the reduction in fossil fuel consumption from most source sectors.

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In My Opinion: On greed, power and making the weather

– By Phil Chadwick, Meteorologist and Eco-Artist –

I figure if one is going to have an opinion about climate change, it had better be an informed opinion. I thought I was well informed but there is always something to learn too. The Weather Makers by Tim Flannery was published in 2005 just after Hurricane Katrina. Fifteen years later not much has changed – the politicians continue to dither.

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A Message from the
Incoming CMOS Bulletin Editor, Nicole Renaud

Hello from Edmonton and Treaty 6 territory, traditional lands of First Nations and Métis people. I am thrilled to be joining the CMOS team as the new Bulletin Editor! My passion for the environment has been a life long build up, with my interest in water security emerging while I lived in Mexico’s Sonoran desert, in the Baja peninsula. While there, I saw locals unable to afford water contrasted against empty golf courses outside of tourist season being draped in water.

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Message from the CMOS President: Welcoming in a Decade for Climate Action

– By Kimberly Strong, CMOS President and Professor & Chair, Department of Physics, University of Toronto –

As 2019 ends and we welcome 2020, we have an opportunity to reflect on some of the events of the last year and where we are heading in the year to come, particularly on the topic of climate change, which has been front and centre in the news all year. Progress on climate action this past year was frustratingly slow for many, particularly given the disagreement at the December COP25 Conference in Madrid,

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Arctic Regional Climate Centre Consensus Statement: TEMPERATURE

– By Gabrielle Gascon1, Katherine Wilson1, Marko Markovic1*, Adrienne Tivy1, Bill Appleby1, Vasily Smolyanitsky2, Valentina Khan3, Helge Tangen4, Eivind Stoylen4, Lene Ostvand4, Johanna Ekman5, Arun Kumar6 and Shanna Combley6

2019 Arctic Summer Seasonal Summary and 2019-2020 Arctic Winter Seasonal Outlook for Temperature

Arctic temperatures continue to warm at more than twice the global mean. Annual surface air temperatures over the last 4 years (2014-2018) in the Arctic have been the highest on record since 1900.

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Message from the CMOS President: Communication, Partnership and Change

– By Kimberly Strong, CMOS President and Professor & Chair, Department of Physics, University of Toronto –

At this time of year, as we enjoy the beautiful fall colours and brace for winter, thoughts of CMOS members also turn to spring as we plan ahead for our annual Congress. The 54th CMOS Congress will be held in Ottawa from May 24 to 28, 2020 with a focus on “Building Societal Resilience to Changing Weather, Climate, Oceans and Environment”. The Local Arrangements Committee, chaired by Bruce Angle, and the Science Programme Committee, co-chaired by Leonard Barrie and Gordon McBean, are hard at work putting together an excellent programme

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Burning Souls

– Review by Frank Johnson, President, Ottawa Instrumentation Ltd –

By David Chernushenko, Published by Green & Gold Inc, paperback, 670 pages, ISBN 978-1-9991138-0-3 $30.00 (CAD).

Into the burgeoning field of climate change novels we receive Burning Souls, by former Ottawa City Councillor David Chernushenko. This book is different. Do not pick it up unless you’re prepared to stay up late finishing it.

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Haowen Qin, Budding Meteorologist and CMOS’ Youngest Member

– An Interview by CMOS Bulletin Editor, Sarah Knight –

At 17-years old, Haowen Qin is an incredibly passionate and knowledgeable budding meteorologist, and is CMOS’ youngest member to date. I recently had the opportunity to interview Haowen, at the urgings of our very own Prof. Douw Steyn who has been mentoring this young man and has seen what his curiosity, intelligence and drive are capable of. Read the quite remarkable story of Haowen’s relationship with meteorology,

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For previous issues go to the Archives page on the main CMOS site.

© 2017 Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society

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