The Challenge of Maintaining Fraser River Sockeye Salmon in a Warming World

– By David Levy –

This article first appeared in The Province on September 13, 2020.

Opinion: The DFO has done the right thing this year by closing Fraser sockeye fisheries.

The return of only 283,000 Fraser River sockeye in 2020, the lowest number recorded, has again triggered expressions of concern for these iconic salmon, debate as to what is causing their demise and recognition of the critical need for effective conservation strategies.

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Weather and Climate: Not what your grandparents knew! – CMOS Webinar

David Phillips, Senior Climatologist, Environment and Climate Change Canada

CMOS Toronto and Ottawa Centre Webinar

Urban floods, ice rains, winter heat waves, interface wildfires, weather bombs, megadroughts – if you think we’ve been cursed and clobbered a lot harder and a lot more often recently, you are not imagining it.

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Remembering Louis Fortier

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Dr. Louis Fortier in Quebec City, on the 4th of October at the age of 66, following a courageous fight against leukemia. He was the son of Pierre Fortier (1923-2012) and Louise Roy (1925-1989).

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Meteorological Masterclass Webinar Series

The Royal Meteorological Society has joined with the University of Reading to offer a Meteorological Masterclass Series providing training for professionals working in Meteorology and Climate Science. Leading experts will present the latest science for understanding and predicting storm track behaviour across three timescales: from the synoptic-scale meteorology of storms and blocking, to weather-regimes and their consequences for extended-range forecasting and the impacts of climate change and its simulation.

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Micrometeorological Variables and Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Two Climate Regions of Quebec

– By Richard Leduc, Ph.D., AirMet Science Inc., and Jean-François Brière, Ministère de l’Environnement et de la Lutte contre les changements climatiques

The US-EPA (2019a) AERMOD dispersion model is widely used to assess the concentration of contaminants in ambient air as a result of emissions from a source. To this end, AERMOD requires micrometeorological variables characterizing turbulence (u*, w*, L, zic, zim); they are calculated by the AERMET module and obtained using local surface and upper air data (wind, temperature and cloud opacity),

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2020 Arctic Summer Seasonal Climate Outlook for Sea-Ice

– By contributors from Environment and Climate Change Canada, the University of Québec at Montréal, the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, the Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia, The Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Finnish Meteorological Institute, World Meteorological Organization, Climate Prediction Center, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration –

Arctic Climate Forum Consensus Statement (Continued)

Highlights

Warmer than normal surface air temperatures over Eurasia and the Arctic Ocean contributed to below to near normal ice conditions during the 2019-2020 winter across the entire Arctic.

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2020 Arctic Summer Seasonal Climate Outlook for Temperature and Precipitation

– By contributors from Environment and Climate Change Canada, the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, the Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia, The Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Finnish Meteorological Institute, World Meteorological Organization, Climate Prediction Center, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration –

Arctic Climate Forum Consensus Statement

And Summary of the 2020 Arctic Winter Season

CONTEXT

Arctic temperatures continue to warm at more than twice the global mean. Annual surface air temperatures over the last 4 years (2016–2019) in the Arctic (60°–85°N) have been the highest in the time series of observations for 1936-2019.

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skyscraper view of traffic lights and Vancouver tower

Air Pollution in the Time of COVID-19

– By D.G. Steyn, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., and Kyle Howe, Air Quality and Climate Change, Metro Vancouver Regional District, Burnaby, B.C. –

The COVID-19 pandemic is disrupting many aspects of society globally, nationally and locally. The most direct effect is the human health tragedy of increased morbidity and mortality caused by the disease. Beyond that, the legislated curtailment of human movement to slow the spread of the virus has resulted in economies being placed in what has been called a “medically induced coma”. Closely associated with the sharp slowdown in economic activity has been the reduction in fossil fuel consumption from most source sectors.

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