Working Together for the Arctic: The Arctic Regional Climate Centre Network (ArcRCC)

– by Michael Crowe, Katherine Wilson, and John Parker –

The effects of climate change are being felt around the world, but nowhere as intensely and as obviously as in the Arctic. Many sources can be cited that put the rate of temperature increase in the Arctic over the last 30-50 years as at least twice that over the rest of the globe. These temperature increases have led to significant reductions of sea ice, thawing permafrost and coastal erosion that affect all Northerners, including Indigenous communities and industry.

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image for message from CMOS president Paul Kushner on global warming shows a pocket watch half buried in sand

Message from the CMOS President for December 2018: Anthropogenic climate change and environmental sustainability

– By Paul Kushner, Professor, Department of Physics, University of Toronto and CMOS President –

To complete our review of the stewardship themes I identified at the time of the Halifax congress, it’s time to highlight environmental stewardship and sustainability, particularly in the area of anthropogenic climate change. The last two months have witnessed the increasingly urgent messages

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CMOS Statement on the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C

The Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS) is the national society dedicated to advancing atmospheric, oceanic, and related environmental sciences in Canada. CMOS has more than 800 members from Canada’s major research centres, universities, private corporations and government institutes. CMOS is uniquely positioned to provide expert advice to Canadians on the science of climate change.

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A Look at Ontario’s Climate of the Future with the Ontario Climate Data Portal (OCDP)

– by Huaiping Zhu1, Ziwang Deng1, Jinliang Liu2, Xin Qiu3, Xiaoyu Chen1, Xiaolan Zhou1

Climate change is undeniable, and scientists around the world agree that in the coming decades the effects of a warming planet are only going to become more and more felt. What does climate change mean for Ontario? The development of the Ontario Climate Data Portal (OCDP)

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Ice: Nature and Culture

– Review by Bob Jones, CMOS Archivist –

By Klaus Dodds, Published by Reaktion Books, distributed by University of Chicago Press, Paperback, 229 pages, ISBN-13: 978-1-78023-905-7, $ 24.95 (USD)

Ice is not a science textbook about ice, nor is it a manual of Ice Forecasting (the reviewer will know as he was an Ice Forecaster with the Meteorological Service of Canada in a former life). Rather it is a wide-ranging exploration of the cultural, natural and geopolitical history of ice.

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The Passing of Morley Thomas 1918-2018

– By David Phillips, Climatologist and Author –

Morley Thomas, affectionately known as Canada’s Mr. Climatology, died on March 31, 2018 in Watford, ON a few weeks after a fall and successful surgery on a broken hip. International meteorology lost a leader and skillful diplomat; Canadian meteorology lost a staunch and vigorous supporter over 65 years; and I lost a dear friend and remarkably generous mentor.

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CMOS Congress 2018 in Halifax, scenes from the poster session.

Highlights from the 52nd Annual CMOS Congress in Halifax

– By Heather Desserud, CMOS 2018 Local Organizing Committee, Halifax –

Earlier this month, the 52nd Annual Congress took place in the beautiful seaside city of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Attendees from across Canada and around the world gathered in the new downtown Convention Centre during June 10-14, participating in scientific programming and enjoying East Coast hospitality.

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