Assessing Drift and Dispersion in Models of the St. Lawrence Estuary

– By Donovan Allum –

1. Introduction

The largest estuary in the world is the St. Lawrence Estuary and connects the – aptly named – St. Lawrence River to the Gulf of St. Lawrence and then the Atlantic Ocean. The river begins at Lake Ontario, passing important landmarks such as Kingston, Montreal, Trois-Rivières and Quebec City before emptying into the Gulf of St. Lawrence near the Gaspé Peninsula.

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Listening to Narwhal

– By Kristin Westdal –

Mittimatalik (formerly Pond Inlet) is a small hamlet on the north end of Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic. Surrounded by mountains, rivers, and glaciers, the community sits on the shores of beautiful Eclipse Sound. These waters are a biological hot spot, teeming with marine life, including the world’s largest population of narwhal each summer. To protect this habitat, Canada established the Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area.

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Ocean School – An unforgettable virtual experience

– By Heather Delagran and Sonya Lee –

Imagine you are flying over the lush temperate rainforest of British Columbia’s central coast. Thick vegetation covers the ground between towering trees. Two bears wander along a log-strewn beach. In the distance, there are rounded mountain peaks.

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Fog over Sable Island

– By Li Cheng, Zheqi Chen, Peter Taylor, Yongsheng Chen and George Isaac –

Introduction

Marine fog occurs frequently offshore from Atlantic Canada. It can cause problems for helicopter flights to offshore worker from Newfoundland and any flights to the National Park on Sable Island, Nova Scotia as well as in many coastal communities along the East Coast.

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plastic pollution on a beach

Why Canada Urgently Needs to Support a Global Plastic Treaty

– By Tom Gammage –

Plastic pollution is widely recognised as one of the most salient environmental and human health crises of the modern time. From extraction of the fossil fuels used to produce it to its manufacture, use, and end of life disposal, the lifecycle of plastic severely impacts every level of biological organisation – from genes to ecosystems.

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