Sea Ice Analysis and Forecasting: Towards an Increased Reliance on Automated Prediction Systems

– Review by André April, Environment and Climate Change Canada –

Edited by Tom Carrieres, Mark Buehner, Jean-François Lemieux and Leif Toudal Pedersen, Cambridge University Press, Hardback, 219 pages, ISBN: 9781108417426, $ 143.95 (CAD)

Sea ice is an important indicator of climate change as recent observations of declining ice amounts in the Arctic show. Automatic predictions available in real time are comparable to numerical environmental prediction models and may be very beneficial for national ice forecasting services, with applications to research and transport sectors, for example.

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CMOS Congress 2018 in Halifax, scenes from the poster session.

Highlights from the 52nd Annual CMOS Congress in Halifax

– By Heather Desserud, CMOS 2018 Local Organizing Committee, Halifax –

Earlier this month, the 52nd Annual Congress took place in the beautiful seaside city of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Attendees from across Canada and around the world gathered in the new downtown Convention Centre during June 10-14, participating in scientific programming and enjoying East Coast hospitality.

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EON-ROSE: Integrating Climate Science and Earth science

– By K.J.E., Boggs1, P., Audet2, D.W., Eaton3, M. Fayek4, J.T., Freymueller5, R.D., Hyndman6, T. James6, P.J., Kushner7, P. Myers8, M.G., Sideris3, P. Sullivan9, and M. Ulmi6

Across the globe, climate change, population growth, natural hazards and the need for long term sustainability of resource supply (including materials, energy and food) demand new approaches to Earth System Sciences.

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CMOS Founding Member Dick Morgan Turns 100

– By David Nowell, Elizabeth Marshall and Veronica Leonard –

A member of CMOS and its predecessor, the Canadian Branch of the Royal Meteorological Society, for over 50 years, CDR/Dr Maurice Richard (Dick) Morgan recently celebrated his 100th birthday.

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A New Option for at Sea Canadian Ocean Science?

– By Donald Reid and Douglas Bancroft, Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility (CSSF) –

The Canadian Coast Guard’s ability to support Canadian Ocean Science with ship time and facilities has been and will continue to decline even after the anticipated new science ships enter service in the coming years. It is hoped that this could be alleviated with the upcoming delivery of the versatile Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships to the Royal Canadian Navy beginning in 2018.

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Wind-Driven Upwelling and Seawater Chemistry in British Columbia’s Shellfish Aquaculture Capital

– By Ben Moore-Maley(1), Debby Ianson(2), Susan Allen(1); 1: Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia; 2: Institute of Ocean Sciences, Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada –

Growth of the BC shellfish aquaculture industry has fallen behind the provincial government’s 1997 projections. While the impact of farming density is under investigation, changes in carbonate chemistry due to ocean acidification have been shown to reduce growth and survival, particularly in juvenile shellfish.

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Photograph of the UBC Glider in the water, used for the study of baleen whale habitats of Roseway Basin, NS. Glider is a long yellow tube, with wings and a tail fin. It is shown floating just beneath the surface of the water.

Ocean Gliders to Study Baleen Whale Habitat in Roseway Basin

– By T. Howatt(1) T. Ross(2), S. Waterman(1); 1: University of British Columbia, 2: Institute of Ocean Sciences –

Canadian coastal waters are interspersed with baleen whale habitats, some of which are well known and protected, while others have yet to be identified and characterized.

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