Searching towards creating a sustainable integrated mesonet for the Canadian Prairie Provinces

– By Jeannine-Marie St-Jacques1, Aston Chipanshi2, Trevor Hadwen2, Allan Friesen1, and David Sauchyn3

Due to the continental nature of the Canadian Prairie Provinces, their weather and climate are characterized by extremes. With this reality, the Prairie Provinces should benefit from high resolution weather monitoring from an integrated weather mesonet. A mesonet consists of any number of automated weather stations with an average spacing of 1 to 50 kilometers. This station spacing is much denser

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Canada’s Top Ten Weather Stories of 2019

– By David Phillips, Environment and Climate Change Canada (article source: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/top-ten-weather-stories/2019.html) –

Canadians are experiencing more and more extreme weather, from intense and lengthy heat waves, to suffocating smoke and haze from wildfires, to extreme flooding. Canadian scientists have made a clear link between climate change and extreme weather events. They tell us that while such events can and do occur naturally, much of what we are seeing is driven by human-induced climate change.

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Arctic Regional Climate Centre Consensus Statement: TEMPERATURE

– By Gabrielle Gascon1, Katherine Wilson1, Marko Markovic1*, Adrienne Tivy1, Bill Appleby1, Vasily Smolyanitsky2, Valentina Khan3, Helge Tangen4, Eivind Stoylen4, Lene Ostvand4, Johanna Ekman5, Arun Kumar6 and Shanna Combley6

2019 Arctic Summer Seasonal Summary and 2019-2020 Arctic Winter Seasonal Outlook for Temperature

Arctic temperatures continue to warm at more than twice the global mean. Annual surface air temperatures over the last 4 years (2014-2018) in the Arctic have been the highest on record since 1900.

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Message from the CMOS President: Communication, Partnership and Change

– By Kimberly Strong, CMOS President and Professor & Chair, Department of Physics, University of Toronto –

At this time of year, as we enjoy the beautiful fall colours and brace for winter, thoughts of CMOS members also turn to spring as we plan ahead for our annual Congress. The 54th CMOS Congress will be held in Ottawa from May 24 to 28, 2020 with a focus on “Building Societal Resilience to Changing Weather, Climate, Oceans and Environment”. The Local Arrangements Committee, chaired by Bruce Angle, and the Science Programme Committee, co-chaired by Leonard Barrie and Gordon McBean, are hard at work putting together an excellent programme

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Radar Events Initiative

– By Phil Chadwick, Meteorologist and Eco-Artist –

Tenacity may be a good thing especially if it is well intentioned – the objective analysis of the weather services provided by Environment Canada. The following was written in 2004 to address some perceived deficiencies. The quality and quantity of radar were expanding and there were many imperative applications for that burgeoning information. The following were just a few of those and I had many more in the queue ready for implementation.

Now 15 years later I have not yet given up. A new generation of S-Band radars are being deployed across Canada offering much superior data that needs to be fully utilized as this 2004 research proposed.

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The Weather Machine: A Journey Inside The Forecast

– Review by Bob Jones, CMOS Archivist –

By Andrew Blum, Published by HarperCollins Publishers Ltd, hardcover, 224 pages, ISBN 978-1-4434-3859-9, $32.00 (CAD).

Quite by accident I stumbled upon this book in the express collection of the Ottawa Public Library. Seeing it was about weather forecasting, I could not resist it. After reading the short book, I am amazed it was not sent to the CMOS Office like so many other books offered for review in the Bulletin. The Weather Machine is at the core of what meteorologists past and present do, and should be a pre-requisite for any undergrad or grad course in meteorology.

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Comparison of wind forecasts and observations at Lake Saint-Charles, Quebec: Results from 2018

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Replacement of the Canadian Weather Radar Network

– by Sylvain Laramée, Qian Li, Pat Wong, Sylvain Savard, Peter Leibiuk, Steven Brady, Rick Czepita, Hamid Nasr, Todd Benko, Michael Romaniuk, Mark Abt and Ingrid Wong –

Canadian Weather Radar Replacement Program, Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Meteorologists use many tools to forecast Canada’s weather. Among which, radar is a primary tool that provides 3D observations of the atmosphere with high temporal and spatial resolution to assist in forecasting short-term severe weather events such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, ice storms and blizzards.

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