2020-2021 Arctic Winter Seasonal Climate Outlook for Sea Ice

– By contributors from Environment and Climate Change Canada, University of Quebec at Montreal, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, The Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Finnish Meteorological Institute, World Meteorological Organization, Climate Prediction Centre of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the International Arctic Research Center –

Arctic Climate Forum Consensus Statement

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An Update on CMOS’s 2021 Virtual Congress

Update 9 November 2020

1. The 2021 Congress will be entirely on-line, over the 2-week period: 31 May – 12 June. To accommodate different time zones across Canada, the daily conference hours will be shorter: 0800-1300h Pacific Time; 1100h-1600 Eastern Time.

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Announcing the WeatherPod with Alan Thorpe and David Rogers

The WeatherPod – the podcast which explores the role of the weather enterprise in building resilience to extreme weather & climate change.

The WeatherPod is a unique podcast exploring how weather and climate information is produced and used, and the key role of national and international co-operation in addressing the mounting challenges to life, society and business from extreme weather and climate change.

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Weather and Climate: Not what your grandparents knew! – CMOS Webinar

David Phillips, Senior Climatologist, Environment and Climate Change Canada

CMOS Toronto and Ottawa Centre Webinar

Urban floods, ice rains, winter heat waves, interface wildfires, weather bombs, megadroughts – if you think we’ve been cursed and clobbered a lot harder and a lot more often recently, you are not imagining it.

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New Global Weather Enterprise Forum Webinar

Please see register for the following Webinar to be given by Prof. Adrian Gerhard, the President of WMO:
Global Weather Enterprise Forum webinar, 28 October – ‘Unlocking the Benefits of Open Weather Data’.

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Proposed Nomenclature for Fire-induced Vortices

– By Patrick McCarthy and Leanne Cormier –

Extreme fire behaviour can manifest itself in many ways, violent tornado-like vortices being one example. On April 19, 2000, a large out-of-control fire at a major flax straw storage facility in southern Manitoba produced numerous vortices. One vortex emerged out of the inferno, tossing a pickup truck.

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Coping with Extreme Weather: A CMOS Public Virtual Forum/Panel Discussion – October 8, 2020

Marking the 2nd anniversary of the Ottawa/Gatineau Tornadoes

8 October 2020, noon to 2PM EDT

Extreme weather events, including tornadoes, floods, ice storms, hurricanes, droughts and blizzards, are a major risk to life, property and the economy in Canada. The risks are changing as climate changes. The Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS) is pleased to announce a free two-hour online forum for the public.

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Meteorological Masterclass Webinar Series

The Royal Meteorological Society has joined with the University of Reading to offer a Meteorological Masterclass Series providing training for professionals working in Meteorology and Climate Science. Leading experts will present the latest science for understanding and predicting storm track behaviour across three timescales: from the synoptic-scale meteorology of storms and blocking, to weather-regimes and their consequences for extended-range forecasting and the impacts of climate change and its simulation.

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