Image from Isachsen by aAron munson shows an old yellow pick up truck covered in snow, in a frozen garage

Isachsen – An Artist’s Exploration of Isolation Through the Eyes of his Father at a Remote Arctic Weather Station

– An Interview with Doug Munson and aAron munson by Sarah Knight, CMOS Bulletin Editor –

In 1974 Doug Munson, just 19 years old and fresh off 8 months of surface weather and upper air courses, was posted to the remote Isachsen weather station in the Canadian Arctic for a full year. Isachsen was operated on Ellef Ringnes Island from 1948-1978, and for those living there contact with the “outside” world was minimal

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Weather in the Courtroom

– Review by Daryl O’Dowd MSC ACM CO, Consulting Industrial Meteorologist (odowd@weatherdyne.com) –

Book by William H. Haggard, Published by the American Meteorological Society, Paperback 201 pages ISBN 978-1-940033-95-2, $30.00 –

For fans of the television series Law and Order, “Weather in the Courtroom” is the weather book for you. Start with a weather-related crime (or accident), follow it with the gathering of evidence, a jury trial – often with combative lawyers and breath-holding evidence, and then wrap it all up with a verdict.

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A Piece of History: The Canadian Chronometric Radiosonde

– By Kenneth A. Devine –

While temperature profiles to the tropopause had been conducted in Canada for research purposes starting in 1911 (Devine & Strong, 2009), operational upper air systems did not become available until 1929 with the introduction of the radiosonde which had a built in radio transmitter. The radiosonde gave the meteorologist a three dimensional view in real time

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Close up photograph of the eyes of an oyster toad fish.

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Data Points: How Images Can Answer our Questions About the Environment

– A Campbell Scientific advertising feature –

“What caused this unexpected spike in my data?”
“My sensor is offline – did something knock it over?”
“If only I could see for myself what the current conditions are.”
“I wish I had visuals to support the story the data is telling me.”

Anyone monitoring their environment has thought something like this at one time or another,

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