Tag: Environment and Climate Change Canada

Weather and Climate: Not what your grandparents knew! – CMOS Webinar

David Phillips, Senior Climatologist, Environment and Climate Change Canada

CMOS Toronto and Ottawa Centre Webinar

Urban floods, ice rains, winter heat waves, interface wildfires, weather bombs, megadroughts – if you think we’ve been cursed and clobbered a lot harder and a lot more often recently, you are not imagining it.

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Canada’s Top Ten Weather Stories of 2019

– By David Phillips, Environment and Climate Change Canada (article source: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/top-ten-weather-stories/2019.html) –

Canadians are experiencing more and more extreme weather, from intense and lengthy heat waves, to suffocating smoke and haze from wildfires, to extreme flooding. Canadian scientists have made a clear link between climate change and extreme weather events. They tell us that while such events can and do occur naturally, much of what we are seeing is driven by human-induced climate change.

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Message from the CMOS President for February 2019: Advancing Climate Action in Canada

– By Paul Kushner, Professor, Department of Physics, University of Toronto and CMOS President –

At the end of February I was grateful for the special opportunity to participate in the National Climate Change Science and Knowledge Priorities Workshop in Ottawa, a well-organized event hosted by Environment and Climate Change Canada. The workshop brought together a wide variety of experts and stakeholders from the natural and social sciences; from First Peoples, federal, provincial and municipal organizations; and from NGOs and industry.

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Seasonal Outlook for the spring 2019 (MAM) based on the official CanSIPS forecast issued on the 28th Feb. 2019

– By M. Markovic, B. Merryfield, M. Alarie, Environment and Climate Change Canada –

Seasonal Outlook for spring 2019 (March, April, May) in Canada includes warmer temperatures in Eastern Canada and Northern Canada, and cooler ones across the central prairies and in to BC. There are currently weak El Niño conditions in the central equatorial Pacific that are forecast to persist throughout the spring 2019.

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